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This BLOG is for LLNL present and past employees, friends of LLNL and anyone impacted by the privatization of the Lab to express their opinions and expose the waste, wrongdoing and any kind of injustice against employees and taxpayers by LLNS/DOE/NNSA. The opinions stated are personal opinions. Therefore, The BLOG author may or may not agree with them before making the decision to post them. Opinions not conforming to BLOG rules are deleted. Blog author serves as a moderator. For new topics or suggestions, email jlscoob5@gmail.com

Monday, May 4, 2015

(LANL) Managers

(LANL) Managers, please follow the Livermore rules in regards to  the (latest) incident:

1) Do not mention the incident or the names of the injured employees, ever.

2) In the even of serious injury or worse, have a manager call the spouse of the injured employee and tell them to talk to staff relations.

3) Await further instructions from staff relations.

12 comments:

Anonymous said...

Our thoughts and prayers go out to the injured, their families, and their friends.

Anonymous said...

"...(LANL) Managers, please follow the Livermore rules in regards to the (latest) incident:

1) Do not mention the incident or the names of the injured employees, ever.

2) In the even of serious injury or worse, have a manager call the spouse of the injured employee and tell them to talk to staff relations.

3) Await further instructions from staff relations..."

Is there a specific LLNS incident you have in mind where these steps occurred?

Anonymous said...

LLNL gets plenty of workplace incidents all the time, like headaches from staring at a computer screen too long, carpal tunnel syndrome, falling library books, and even cramped legs from sitting too long!

Anonymous said...

Do not mention ... the name of the injured employees, ever.

Perhaps there are privacy issues involved?

Anonymous said...

10:32 PM,

You are correct.

It is called the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) and establishes national standards to guard the privacy of a patient's protected health information.

HIPAA allows for severe civil and criminal penalties for noncompliance, including: fines between $100-$1,500,000 for multiple violations of the same standard in a calendar year, and fines–up to $250,000 and/or imprisonment up to 10 years for knowing misuse of individually identifiable health information.

Anonymous said...

"...It is called the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) and establishes national standards to guard the privacy of a patient's protected health information. ..."

Which must be folded into the concern over a repeat of the same or comparable accident scenario prompting a (perhaps name free) "lessons learned" to all employees.

Anonymous said...

May 6, 2015 at 4:00 PM

Sorry, you don't "fold" someones "concern" into a legal requirement. You either go to jail for your "folding" or you don't. Get a clue about actual legal liability that exists for health care providers. Your "folding of concerns" is nothing but unacceptable, and illegal, meddling into patient privacy laws.

Anonymous said...

"...Sorry, you don't "fold" someones "concern" into a legal requirement. You either go to jail for your "folding" or you don't. Get a clue about actual legal liability that exists for health care providers. Your "folding of concerns" is nothing but unacceptable, and illegal, meddling into patient privacy laws..."

I don't think you fully comprehend what the other 4pm was suggesting. "Folded in" can simply mean consider it within the context of the next step to make sure there is not a reoccurrence.

Anonymous said...

I have psychiatrist friend who often has to talk to investigators doing re-investigations on patients with clearance. He told me that they always ask to see the medical records, and he has to refuse under HIPAA. The clearance form allows them to ask the three questions but is not a medical release. Sorry guys, you have no rights.

Anonymous said...

May 6, 2015 at 4:00 PM

got rekt

Anonymous said...

The concern expressed here over employee safety and public disclosure is foremost in the minds of all, on par with our concern for the injured, the family and coworkers.

The concerns for ensuring employee safety and public disclosure will be managed through existing well-understood and documented incident management and safety review processes to manage the incident investigation and authorization process before a restart is authorized.

Outside reviewers will be part of the incident analysis and the unclassified and non-HIPAA portions of the reports will be part of the public record. Many independant senior personnel familiar with NNSA/DOE incident analyses are available throughout the complex. It is vital that this is done correctly and it will be.

With so many involved and seriousness of the injury, as well as the subject matter, high energy, high power storage systems, this will be a detailed and thorough incident analysis.

One of the work products of this process is a detailed briefing of lessons learned that will be mandatory reading for those involved with similar systems. Other controls and changes may also be mandated by the outcome of the investigation.

NIF had a serious fall injury very early in the project. One of the results of the incident analysis caused Ed to bring in safety consultants from one of the most successful industrial safety cultures in the US. The changes made in emphasizing safety culture were profound at all levels from daily safety briefings and workspace management to project wide safety stop-work orders. The improvement was profound and NIF went on to work millions of work hours while achieving numerous work safety milestones.

Something good can come from the investigation and recommencement of work.

Anonymous said...

"...NIF had a serious fall injury very early in the project..."

UC managed labs back then, LANSLLNS managed labs now. Are the business priorities the same you think?

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